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“On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together” (Acts 20:7, ESV).

Well, Easter Sunday is over, now what? Many evangelical churches invested a lot of time, money, and resources to make Easter Sunday a special time for visitors, but what happens the Sunday after Easter? While Easter Sunday is usually the Sunday of highest attendance for a church, the Sunday after Easter is usually the very opposite. But if we really understand who Jesus is and what the resurrection means, then the Sunday after Easter should be no different than Easter Sunday or any other Sunday of the year. In fact, I would argue that for the Christian, every Sunday is Easter Sunday.

The reason I say that every Sunday is Easter Sunday is because from its beginnings the church gathered on the first day of the week, Sunday, to remember Jesus’ resurrection. Consider the historical record as laid out by Richard Bauckham (see R. J. Bauckham, “Lord’s Day”, in From Sabbath to Lord’s Day, ed. D. A. Carson, pages 221-250).  Bauckham’s arguments are carefully made and humbly presented.  At the risk of oversimplification, I want to summarize them in three points:

  1. The early church met on the Lord’s Day to commemorate Jesus’ Resurrection (Bauckham, 232-245): All four gospels emphasize Jesus’ resurrection on the first day of the week.  Though it cannot be proven that this was the reason established for Sunday worship, early Christians did connect gathering on the first day of the week with the Lord’s resurrection (Bauckham, 236, 240). Early church history attests to this fact as well (see Didache, Justin Martyr’s, First Apology, chapter 67).
  1. By the end of the first century, “Lord’s Day” is seen to be a technical term already in use in reference to the first day of the week/Sunday, the Christian gathering day (Revelation 1:10; see Bauckham, “Lord’s Day,” 222-232).
  1. By the middle of the second century, Lord’s Day worship gatherings are the universal practice of the church (Bauckham, “Lord’s Day,” 230).

From such evidence, I have come to the conclusion that the Lord’s Day is the chosen gathering day for distinctly Christian worship because it was the day that Jesus rose from the dead. Therefore, every Sunday the church gathers, it remembers and celebrates the resurrection of Jesus. In other words, for Christians who understand who Jesus is and what the resurrection means, every Sunday is Easter Sunday! That means that we should gather again this Sunday to remember and celebrate Jesus’ resurrection.

So join us (or another gospel church near you) this Sunday again as we confess together that Jesus Christ is risen and has been granted all authority in heaven and on earth. Join us as we humbly submit to His authoritative Word. Join us as we take the Lord’s Supper this Sunday. Join us as we encourage one another with the good news that Jesus is alive and present with us until He comes again.

Then join us on the mission to tell others that Jesus is alive, for He is risen. Join us as together we await Jesus’ return to consummate the kingdom of righteousness, justice, and peace that He promised. Join us this Sunday, this Lord’s Day, as we celebrate Jesus’ resurrection once again!

Categories : Church, High Pointe
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As we strive to be a God-honoring, Christ-exalting, gospel-centered church, we remind ourselves that God glorifies Himself by taking rebellious sinners and transforming them into those who worship Him in spirit and truth; the Father is seeking such worshipers (John 4:23-24). We also remind ourselves that the church is the people to whom God has entrusted His gospel and who serves as His instrument to reach an unbelieving world.

It is our joy and privilege, then, to join the Father in the gathering of genuine worshipers into the body of Christ. We will, therefore, by any and all means available to us and permissible by Scripture, take the gospel of Christ to unbelieving and unchurched family members, neighbors, co-workers, friends, and acquaintances. However, I want to remind us that the primary evangelism strategy of High Pointe is YOU – each of you having natural, normal, conversations about the gospel with unbelieving, unchurched people.  I want to challenge each one of us to do what no one else can do; invest time in YOUR unbelieving and unchurched family, friends and neighbors, and take advantage of opportunities the Lord provides to speak to them about Jesus – His life, death, resurrection.

A study of the formerly unchurched by Dr. Thom Rainer, President of LifeWay Christian Resources, shows that those who were closest to the unchurched were the most likely to reach them with the gospel. Of all relationships, family relationships proved the most pivotal. Rainer found that “of the different family members, wives were the most often mentioned as important in influencing the formerly unchurched to Christ and the church” (Surprising Insights from the Unchurched, 49).

The same is true in other relationships. Christians who invest in the lives of unbelievers are in the best position to introduce their friends, neighbors and co-workers to Christ and the church. This much has been proven already at High Pointe. Just last Sunday (Easter) our building overflowed with your unchurched family, friends, neighbors and coworkers. In addition, many of the visitor cards we receive each week are filled out by those who were invited to attend High Pointe by a friend or family member. Let me encourage you, then, to invest in the lives of unbelieving and unchurched family members, neighbors, friends and co-workers. When you invest in the life of unbelievers you will have opportunities to share Christ with them that others will never have. So invest in the lives of the unbelieving and unchurched with the intention of having gospel conversations that point them to Christ.

And don’t forget that many unchurched people are open to an invitation to attend a service with you, so ask them to come with you. In fact, invite them to come with you next Sunday as we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, yet again. We promise to pray, plan and prepare for worship gatherings that will honor God, exalt Christ and present the gospel. We will also provide free resources that you can give to your friends and family at the Welcome Counter. I urge you, invest in the lives of unbelievers, then speak to them about Jesus. And as you have opportunity, invite them to come with you as we gather each Lord’s Day to celebrate the resurrection of our Lord, Jesus Christ.

Categories : Austin, Church, High Pointe
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As we share our lives together as a church founded on the gospel, High Pointe will increasingly grow as an attractive witness to the glory of God (Acts 2:42-47).  However, our witness is not merely to be attractional; God has chosen that the church both originate and continue to expand through the intentional witness to Christ through gospel proclamation.  It is to this end that we have been commissioned (Matthew 28:18-20; Mark 16:14-16; Luke 24:44-49; John 20:21; Acts 1:8).  Be encouraged, though, for we have also been promised the power we need for such a mission (Acts 1:8).  Therefore, we go in faith under the authority of Jesus Christ, boldly proclaiming his gospel in the power of the Holy Spirit (1 Thessalonians 2:1-2).  In this light, let me encourage you to pursue ten practices of intentional witness.

1.  Know the gospel (1 Corinthians 15:1-4)!  The gospel is the revelation of God concerning Jesus as the Christ (Matthew 16:16-17); it is a divine message.  One of the ways we encourage you to remember this gospel is with four words: God, Man, Christ, Response.  When we understand the gospel, we know that GOD is holy and created a world without sin.  God provided the man with all he would need to dwell in God’s presence.  However, MAN rebelled against God, declaring his independence because he wanted to be his own king.  Such rebellion requires judgment, the penalty of which is death.  But God in His grace and mercy, provided CHRIST as a substitute to live a life of perfect obedience acceptable to God and to receive upon Himself the penalty of sin.  Jesus was raised from the dead on the third day indicating that the Father accepted His substitute life/death for sinners and had gained victory over sin and death.  Now, all who RESPOND with repentance from sin and faith in Jesus have eternal life.  This is the gospel, the good news that we must know and understand if we are to share it with others.

2.  Live your life in light of this gospel.  As this gospel takes root in our own lives and we begin to apply it to our marriages, parenting, relationships, lives together as a church, etc., then our lives will be markedly different than the world and thereby attractive.  How can we announce that this gospel is the power of God to save and change lives if we who profess Christ continue living just like the world?

3.  Pray and fast for unbelievers (John 14:12-14; 15:7-8).  One reason unbelieving people are not on our minds is because we don’t pray for them.  First, pray that God would break your heart for the lost in general and for specific people in particular.  Then, make a list of unbelieving people and begin praying for them and their salvation because it is God who saves.  But also pray for opportunities throughout the day.  Ask God to open doors for evangelism, then by faith be obedient when the opportunities arise.

4.  Be willing to share your life with unbelievers (1 Thessalonians. 2:1-8).  We can’t just share the gospel word, we must also share our lives, investing in those we desire to reach.  In other words, we must make evangelism part of our normal lifestyle, not a special program!  We need to take time to talk to people everywhere and invite them into our homes for a meal, or small group, or even church.  But, in order to do that, we need to know the culture (1 Corinthians 9:19-23).  The apostle Paul said he became all things to all peoples that he may save some.  We must seek to understand people and their cultures in order to reach them.  That means we need to get to know unbelieving people.  We need to know where they live, shop, eat, recreate and move out of our comfort zones to look for opportunities to relate to them where they are, instead of thinking they will come to us.

5.  Share the gospel with urgency!  We are on an urgent mission (2 Peter 3:8-10)!  We must share the gospel naturally & clearly.  Since the gospel is a word/message about Christ, then we must be word-centered and use the Bible.  Also, the gospel is a word that must be proclaimed!  We cannot keep it to ourselves.  But I think one of the reasons we struggle with evangelism is because we think it is “special” – we have to do it in a “special” way, using a “special” outline, and there are Christians who are “especially” gifted at this.  The truth of the matter is that evangelism is NOT special; it is normal.  Think of evangelism simply as a conversation about who Jesus is.  If using the four words, God, Man, Christ, Response, is helpful, then think through the gospel story in that way.  But in the same way we have normal, every day conversations about the weather, the Longhorns and Aggies, we should think of evangelism as normal – this is a normal activity of every Christian: speaking of Jesus when our conversations permit during the opportunities God gives us.

6.  Study the doctrine of hell!  If you lack urgency in evangelism, then perhaps you should do a personal study of the doctrine of hell.  As you study what the Bible says concerning the fate of those who reject Christ, ask God to break your heart for those who reject Christ and to move you with urgency to share the good news.

7.  Invite unbelievers to repent and believe!  As I mentioned above, the gospel requires a response.  We must call on all people everywhere to repent (turn away from their sinful ways) and believe (in Jesus Christ).

8.  Invite unbelievers to church.  This goes along with sharing our lives with unbelievers and investing in them.  Invite unbelievers and unchurched to come with you on the Lord’s day so that they may hear the gospel proclaimed.  Surprisingly, in a 2010 study of unbeliving, unchurched people in Austin, a large number of people indicated that they would be open to invitations to go to church.  Imagine that!  They don’t come because we don’t ask.

9.  Trust Christ for the results.  Faithfulness, not results is what God requires of us.  Salvation is of the Lord, so we must trust the sovereign Lord to do His work in the hearts of unbelieving people.  Our responsibility is to faithfully share the gospel indiscriminately.

10.  Share with others and ask them to join you in prayer.  I have found it greatly encouraging to hear other Christians’ stories of evangelism and to know that I am accountable to someone for evangelism.  Share your encounters and pray together for those souls.  May the Lord grant us a great harvest of souls!

Categories : Austin, High Pointe, Missions
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Tonight I have the joy of gathering with those who help lead our corporate worship gatherings at High Pointe.  As I was preparing for our teaching on John 4, I was reminded of D. A. Carson’s comprehensive definition of worship in Worship by the Book (26):

Worship is the proper response of all moral, sentient beings to God, ascribing all honor and worth to their Creator-God precisely because he is worthy, delightfully so.  This side of the fall, human worship of God properly responds to the redemptive provisions that God has graciously made.  While all true worship is God-centered, Christian worship is no less Christ-centered.  Empowered by the Spirit and in line with the stipulations of the new covenant, it manifests itself in all our living, finding its impulse in the gospel, which restores our relationship with our Redeemer-God and therefore also with our fellow image-bearers, our co-worshipers.  Such worship therefore manifests itself both in adoration and in action, both in the individual believer and in corporate worship, which is worship offered up in the context of the body of believers, who strive to align all the forms of their devout ascription of all worth to God with the panoply of new covenant mandates and examples that bring to fulfillment the glories of antecedent revelation and anticipate consummation.

Here is David Peterson’s initial definition of worship from Engaging with God: A Biblical Theology of Worship (20):

The worship of the living and true God is essentially an engagement with him on the terms that he proposes and in the way that he alone makes possible.

 

Categories : High Pointe, Theology
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Yesterday I argued that we are to expect persecution because the environment we have been sent into is one of hostility (Matthew 10:16).  If we are to expect persecution, then we should prepare ourselves for it.  But how?  In a day in which some young “radical” Christians are prepared to charge the gates of hell with water pistols or be “dropped” into Al Quaeda camps with nothing but a Bible, Jesus offers some surprising instructions.

Preparing for Persecution

Be wise and full of integrity (Matthew 10:16)!  Jesus commands his followers to be “wise as serpents” and “innocent as doves.”  Snakes are crafty, cunning, even wise.  When a snake coils up and prepares to strike, it is because it senses a threat.  A snake’s “instinct is one of self-preservation” (France, Matthew, 390).  Yet, this command to be “shrewd” is tempered by the next command to be innocent like doves.  Doves were considered pure animals for a variety of reasons.  So then, like snakes we are to wisely avoid confrontation, not foolishly seeking death; but like doves, we are to be pure in our mission efforts and deal with our opponents with integrity.

John Nolland in his commentary on Matthew captures this well (pg. 423-24): “The wisdom called for from the disciples will involve anticipating danger and avoiding it whenever possible, but not in such a way as to undercut their mission priorities.  The innocence called for will involve a consistent integrity that is prepared to suffer rather than compromise and which is careful to give no grounds for legitimate legal objection to the action of the disciples.”  In other words, to be wise and full of integrity is a call to anticipate danger but avoid it whenever possible without compromising the mission.

The best example I have witnessed of such shrewdness that is full of integrity has been among our Cuban brothers.  Those brothers whom I have had the privilege to know are humble men who navigate through the territory of a government that is hostile to the gospel.  Sure, the government wants to put on a face of religious freedom to the world, but the reality is that local governing officials can make it difficult for local church leaders and churches.  Our Cuban brothers are faithful to King Jesus, while also submitting to the governing authorities as appropriate.  One example of the shrewdness that Jesus calls us to was when the government demanded that there be no new building of churches.  The brothers submitted to that government demand.  Yet, rather than complain about this circumstance, pastors continued the mission by spreading the gospel through house churches.  Thus, a wide-spread house church movement has taken place on the island nation because our Cuban brothers were as shrewed as snakes and as innocent as doves.

I have learned much from our Cuban brothers.  Whenever we travel there, they help us obtain religious visas from their government so that our visit is recorded and legal.  Additionally, we also make sure that our government knows of our visits.  We want to be above reproach, submitting to both governments as appropriate, so as to provide a faithful and consistent witness to the governing authorities there and here.  Unfortunately, I’ve run into Christian groups from the United States seeking to minister on the island while violating the laws of both the Cuban government and ours.  I don’t think that is either wise or innocent.  It provides a terrible witness and compromises the mission.

Be on the lookout for hostile people (10:17-18, 21-22)

Even when we submit to governing authorities, however, it doesn’t meant that it will always work out as we had hoped.  Jesus reminds his followers that we are continually to be on the lookout for those who would want to do us harm.  It is possible that some of us will be handed over to “religious” authorities, should such exist (10:17).  In Cuba, for example, the Communist government has a religious affairs office through which all religious visas must be approved.  Technically, they are governing authorities with oversight of religious activity.

It is possible that some of us will be brought before governing authorities (10:18).  Once, while on one of my early visits to Cuba, I was given a citation to appear before officials at the department of immigration.  Much to my surprise, it was a department run by the military.  I first appeared before an enlisted official before finally ending up in a Lieutenant Colonel’s office with our entire team.  Never once did I have to face fear of imprisonment or life.  The conversations were cordial and calm without any threats; it was merely a meeting to intimidate our team by informing us as to what we were permitted to do and not do.  However, I have to confess that I failed in that instance to take advantage of the opportunity to give testimony to our Lord.

Sadly, there may be instances when even those closest to us may turn against us and turn us over to officials for punishment (10:21).  The reality is that because we declare allegiance to King Jesus, all will hate us (10:22; cf. John 15:18-26).  Nevertheless, we have the assurance that those who endure to the end will be saved (10:22).

When we understand our mission and the hostility of the environment into which we are sent, we will not only expect persecution, we will prepare for it.  As we prepare to face hostility in this world because of our allegiance to King Jesus, may we continually walk in wisdom and integrity so that we may know how to respond when the time comes.

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Aug
28

What is the Mission of the Church?

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“Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son
and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you.”
(Matthew 28:19-20, ESV).

            On Sunday morning, we began an important three sermon series on the mission of the church from Matthew 10.  If you missed the first message, you can listen to it here: What is the Mission of the Church? (Matthew 9:35-10:15)  In this message I argued, among other things, that while all Christians are called to witness, some are called to go to other cultures where Jesus Christ has not been named and where there is little gospel presence – those called to go and sent by the church are called missionaries.

The harvest is plentiful . . .  According to the Joshua Project, there are presently 6,909 unreached people groups in the world.  A people group is a particular group of people who share ethnicity and language (ethno-linguistic).  Unreached means that less than 2% of a people group are gospel Christians.  In our world of 7.13 billion people, 3.96 billion are part of unreached people groups.  That means that approximately 56% of the world population is within the unreached category.  Additionally, 3,010 people groups are not only unreached, they are also unengaged, meaning that there is no Christian witness among them.  The unreached, unengaged total a population of just over 195 million people; that’s roughly two thirds of the population of the United States.  Yes! The harvest is plentiful!

But the laborers are few . . .  While in 2010 the United States sent out over 127,000 missionaries, the fact is that according to the Center for the Study of Global Christianity (CSGC) at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, “the ten countries with the most non-Christians in 2010 were home to 73% of all non-Christians globally.  Because many of them deny or restrict missionary access, however, they received only 9% of all international missionaries.”  On the flip side, would you like to know what country received the most missionaries in 2012?  According to a Christianity Today article, it was “the United States, with 32,400 sent from other nations.”  There may seem to be a lot of laborers generally speaking, but where it counts, the laborers truly are few!

Let us ask God for more laborers in strategic places . . .  Jesus asked his disciples to pray for more laborers.  We should do the same.  Let us ask our Father to send more laborers to take the message of king Jesus to places where He has not been named and where there is very little gospel presence.  And let us send and support these missionaries with prayer and finances so that they may be free to focus on the mission to make disciples of all nations, teaching them to obey everything Jesus has commanded.

What do missionaries do?  To help our thinking as to what missionaries are called to do on the mission field, I want to recommend you read Kevin DeYoung’s great blog post on that subject.  You can read it here: The Goal of Missions and the Work of Missionaries.  May the Lord grant us much grace and favor as we seek to proclaim Jesus and call all peoples to repent and believe in Him and live a life worthy of this gospel in the midst of local, healthy congregations.

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Mar
04

Cultivating a Culture of Peace

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“But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial and sincere.  And a harvest of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace.”
(James 3:17-18, ESV)

             The gospel is a gospel of peace.  It declares that since the time of Adam’s sin we have been born into this world as God’s enemy: hostile in mind and engaged in evil deeds (Colossians 1:21) against God (Romans 8:7).  The most holy God had every right to declare the differences between Him and us irreconcilable.  Yet, in His wisdom and love God chose to reconcile us to Himself through Jesus Christ (1 Timothy 2:5).  By judging our sin at the cross of Christ, Holy God is able to reconcile to Himself us who receive Christ’s sacrifice on our behalf by faith.

Through Christ, we who have been reconciled to God have also been given a ministry of reconciliation (2 Corinthians 5:18-21).  As ministers of reconciliation, we proclaim this gospel of reconciliation to the world in order that all peoples may be reconciled to God through the death of Christ.  But our ministry of reconciliation does not end there, for we must continue living in the light of the reconciling work of Christ.  Consequently, we must live our lives reconciled to one another.

Even though we Christians have been reconciled to God through Christ, far too many professing Christians still live in conflict with others.  Such conflict is manifested in marriages, homes, workplaces, even church relationships.  Unfortunately, many of us address such conflicts according to worldly wisdom rather than heavenly wisdom.  This is why Christians have as many divorces as non-Christians, why they stop talking to fellow Christians, why they leave churches over conflict, and why churches even split over conflict.

What kind of Christian testimony do we offer this world if we are reconciled to God through Christ but fail to be reconciled to one another?  One of the most powerful witnesses we can provide our community is the witness of reconciled relationships that flow from being reconciled to God.  If we are to live in such an atmosphere, then we must cultivate a culture of peace.  According to Ken Sande, author of The Peacemaker, a culture of peace is a culture where “people are eager and able to resolve conflict and reconcile relationships in a way that clearly reflects the love and power of Jesus Christ” (291).  If we are to cultivate such a culture of peace, then we must have a biblical strategy for resolving conflict.  Sande offers the following counsel (the four “G’s”):

Glorify God (1 Corinthians 10:31).  Our entire lives must be motivated by a desire to glorify God.  Get the log out of your eye (Matthew 7:5).  We must first look at our own hearts in order to discern our contributions to conflicts.  Gently restore (Galatians 6:1).  The Bible gives us clear instruction in approaching those with whom we have conflict.  Go and be reconciled (Matthew 5:24).  Once we have addressed conflict, we must be willing to restore relationships.

Let us cultivate a culture of peace in our home and in our church.  May we be about God’s glory, and address conflict biblically by first looking at our own hearts, then approaching one another with the goal of reconciled relationships that give evidence to the fact that we are a people reconciled to God through Jesus Christ.

Listen to Sunday’s Sermon on Forgiveness:
Forgiving as the Father Has Forgiven Us
Matthew 6:14-15

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“On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together. . .”
(Acts 20:7, ESV)

            If the Lord’s Day (Sunday) is the day chosen by the early church for distinctly Christian corporate worship, how should we approach the Lord’s Day as 21st Century believers?  I want to offer four simple exhortations that will help us as we consider gathering together each Lord’s Day.

            SET ASIDE the Lord’s day for distinctly Christian worship gatherings!  If you are free and able, you should gather with the Lord’s people on Sundays.  If you are free and able, then set aside the entire day for Christian worship.  I say this not as a command (It wasn’t REQUIRED until Constantine), but for concern for your welfare.  Use this day to gather with God’s people both formally as we assemble together and informally to eat meals together, pray together, read together, sing together.  When you set aside the Lord’s Day and don’t let other things crowd out your schedule, you will find that this day will become much more meaningful as you share it with your family or other brothers and sisters in Christ.  If you are not a faithful part of a local assembly, then commit yourself to a gospel-centered, Word-saturared, Christ-exalting church.

PREPARE yourself for gathering with God’s people on the Lord’s Day – on Saturday evening and on Sunday morning.  Too many times we come to the Christian assembly consumed by the cares of this world.  Also, we often arrive distracted by tiredness due to the activities we choose to participate in the previous evening.  Consider using Saturday evenings to prepare your hearts and minds for the Sunday gathering.  Consider the texts that will be preached on Sunday.  At High Pointe, we offer meditation passages related to the preaching texts via our weekly email.  Read through these passages on Saturday night; share them with your family.  And be sure to get a good night’s rest.

When you arrive to assemble greet the brethren, then consider the passages that will be read publicly.  At High Pointe, they are written in the bulletin for your convenience.  Finally, when you hear the music begin, join in as we sing praises to our Lord and prepare your minds and hearts for what is about to happen.

            DECLARE the Lordship of Christ with God’s people as you gather on the Lord’s Day! 

1.  SING – In singing, we are jointly declaring the Lordship of Christ over all things.  Declare with your lips that Jesus is Lord and worthy to receive all glory and honor and praise!

2.  PRAY – In praying, we jointly declare our dependence upon Jesus, the Lord who provides for the needs of His people.  Therefore, cast all your anxieties upon the Lord.

3.  GIVE – In giving, we are declaring the Lordship of Jesus Christ over all our wealth and possessions.  Since Jesus is the sovereign Lord who provides everything we need, He is the Lord of everything we have.

4.  READ/LISTEN TO THE WORD – In preaching the Word, we are declaring the Lordship of Christ and urging those who do not presently submit to Jesus’ Lordship to repent, bow down or be consumed in His wrath.  Be careful how we listen; pray for the preacher; obey the Word!

            In all things REST in Christ!  Do not rest in what you do: i.e., Lord’s Day attendance/participation, membership, giving, etc.  Rest in Christ, the Lord of the Sabbath, for His yoke is easy and His burden is light.

Categories : Church, High Pointe, Sermons
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New-Service-Times

We want to remind our High Pointe family that this Sunday, January 13, we will begin gathering at new times.  As noted above, we will gather at 10:00 on Sunday mornings and 5:00 on Sunday evenings.  We pray this schedule will bless our church family.

Categories : Church, High Pointe
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Matthew

High Pointe Preaching Schedule
Pastor Juan Sanchez

Mini-Series: True Righteousness
2012

December 16
True Righteousness: Urgently Pursuing Peace in an Evil World
Matthew 5:21-26

2013

January 6
True Righteousness: Radically Fighting Against Sin & Temptation in a Lust-Filled World
Matthew 5:27-30

January 13
True Righteousness: Faithfully Reflecting the Divine Marriage in a No-Fault Divorce World
Matthew 5:31-32

January 20
True Righteousness: Continually Walking in Truth & Integrity in a Dishonest World
Matthew 5:33-37

January 27
True Righteousness: Patiently Awaiting Divine Justice in a Vigilante World
Matthew 5:38-42

February 3
True Righteousness: Vulnerably Reflecting the Love of the Father in a Hate-Filled World
Matthew 5:43-48

Mini-Series: True Religion
February 10
True Religion: Giving so as to Receive Our Father’s Reward
Matthew 6:1-4

February 17
True Religion: Praying so as to Receive Our Father’s Hearing
Matthew 6:5-13

February 24
True Religion: Forgiving so as to Receive Our Father’s Forgiveness
Matthew 6:14-15

March 3
True Religion: Fasting so as to Receive Our Father’s Food
Matthew 6:16-18

March 10
True Religion: Investing so as to Receive Our Father’s Inheritance
Matthew 6:19-34

Mini-Series: Kingdom Living in a Foreign World
March 17
Kingdom Living in a Foreign World: Be Discerning without Being Judgmental
Matthew 7:1-6

March 24
Kingdom Living in a Foreign World: Ask Our Father for the Things You Need
Matthew 7:7-12

March 31 (Easter)
Kingdom Living in a Foreign World: Two Paths that Lead to Two Different Destinies
Matthew 7:13-28

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